Books, Feminism, marriage, movies

18th Century’s English mindset same as modern India’s?

English: "So much love and eloquence"...
English: “So much love and eloquence” – Mr. Collins proposes to Charlotte Lucas. Austen, Jane. Pride and Prejudice. London: George Allen, 1894, page 156. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

“It is a truth universally acknowledged, that a single man in possession of a good fortune must be in want of a wife.”

For those who do not know, this is the first line Pride & Prejudice by Jane Austin.

Recently, on account of Valentines Day, I decided to spend it with, who else other than, Mr. Darcy.

And while I was watching the movie, One scene came up, and then like a flash, I realized that the thoughts of the people of that era was not much different for our society in  2013!

This can be seen in the book by the following lines:

Charlotte herself was tolerably composed.  She had gained her point, and had time to consider of it.  Her reflections were in general satisfactory.  Mr. Collins, to be sure, was neither sensible nor agreeable; his society was irksome, and his attachment to her must be imaginary.  But still he would be her husband.  Without thinking highly either of men or matrimony, marriage had always been her object; it was the only provision for well-educated young women of small fortune, and however uncertain of giving happiness, must be their pleasantest preservative from want.  This preservative she had now obtained; and at the age of twenty-seven, without having ever been handsome, she felt all the good luck of it. (22.3)

In this scene, Elizabeth’s best friend Charlotte Lucas comes to tell her that she is engaged to Mr. Collins.

Elizabeth Bennet: Charlotte!
Charlotte Lucas: My dear Lizzy. I’ve come to tell you the news. Mr. Collins and I are… engaged.
Elizabeth Bennet: To be married?
Charlotte Lucas: Yes of course. What other kind of engaged is there?
[Lizzy looks shocked]
Charlotte Lucas: Oh, for Heaven’s sake! Don’t look at me like that Lizzy! There is no earthly reason why I shouldn’t be as happy with him as any other.
Elizabeth Bennet: But he’s ridiculous!
Charlotte Lucas: Oh hush! Not all of us can afford to be romantic. I’ve been offered a comfortable home and protection. There’s a lot to be thankful for.
Elizabeth Bennet: But…
Charlotte Lucas: I’m twenty-seven years old, I’ve no money and no prospects. I’m already a burden to my parents and I’m frightened. So don’t you judge me, Lizzy. Don’t you dare judge me!

mmmmm….

27 year old unmarried girl feels like a burden to her parents, now where have I heard this before? *putting on a fake thinking expression*

O right!

I hear it EVERYDAY, in EVERY  blog of substance and in EVERY newspaper! Not in the same lines, of course …

If you liked this, you may also like:

http://www.youthkiawaaz.com/2011/04/nearing-30-tale-of-an-indian-woman/

http://in.answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20120309062121AA4Bb7i

http://indianhomemaker.wordpress.com/2011/12/19/pregnant-at-fifteen-no-moral-issues-unmarried-and-pregnant-at-fifteen-degeneration-of-society/

http://blog.abhinav.com/2010/03/being-single-%E2%80%93-a-stigmata-to-the-indian-society/

http://indianhomemaker.wordpress.com/tag/arranged-marriages/

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